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EFPIA

EFPIA Disclosure “Sunshine Act – Lite”

Transparence santé, Sunshine Act

Thomas Sullivan, April 13, 2016. For the first time, on June 30, 2016, pharmaceutical companies will be forced to disclose full data on payments made to doctors across Europe. Starting then, all pharmaceutical companies will be required to publish payments they made in the previous year to physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals (HCPs), identifying them by name when possible. The rules will also encompass payments made to hospitals and other healthcare organizations (HCOs) across thirty-three European countries. This move is huge for the industry’s relationship with doctors, and reflects a global move toward greater transparency – for better or …

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UK’s Version of EFPIA Disclosure: Bred with the Sunshine Act in Mind

Transparence santé, Sunshine Act

Thomas Sullivan, April 13, 2016. While this move was prompted by EFPIA (the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations), thirty-three countries in Europe will apply the transparency goals and recommendations in different ways. Some countries are opting for a central platform database similar to the UK database, and others will allow for payment disclosures to be made on company’s own websites. Some countries (i.e., France, Slovakia, Greece, Romania) have even passed legislation to make disclosures of payments to healthcare professionals mandatory. ABPI believes that while the EFPIA requirement only mandates that payment information be available on the relevant Member …

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A Sunshine Act for Scotland ?

Peter John Gordon : Over two years ago I raised a petition with the Scottish Parliament to urge the Scottish Government to introduce a Sunshine Act for Scotland. A Sunshine Act would make it mandatory for healthcare workers (and hopefully academics and all allied health professionals) to declare fully any payments including payments in kind. The argument I presented was that a single, searchable, independent register underpinned by statute would ensure transparency, promote scientific integrity, reduce the potential for harm and save money. My petition was closed earlier this month by the Scottish Parliament as the Scottish Government had committed …

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Disclosure of drug company payments to healthcare professionals is on its way in the UK — a big step towards transparency

Social Vigilance, Pharmacovigilance

Around £40m is paid to healthcare professionals in the UK each year by pharmaceutical companies. These payments are unidentifiable, made available on an aggregate basis. However, from 30 June 2016, for the first time patients will be able find out if their doctor, pharmacist or other healthcare professional has received any payments from a pharmaceutical company. The payments, which could include being paid to attend a medical event or acting as an adviser to a pharmaceutical or medical device company, will be listed on a publicly searchable database called Disclosure UK. This will be hosted by the Association of British …

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Working together: how is the relationship with healthcare professionals regulated?

I want the people that make the medicines my family uses and the people that prescribe them to have a strong, productive and ethical relationship. To me it seems entirely sensible that there is an open exchange of information between the scientists and experts that spend years developing a new medicine and the clinicians that will make decisions on our treatment. It is a critical relationship and one that has delivered much for many over the years. It is also a relationship that is changing constantly. In recent years, companies have placed less emphasis on sales representatives and calls, instead …

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Countdown to pharma disclosure in Europe – but cultural divides remain

Disclosure Code, EFPIA

The pharma industry is just months away from laying bare its relationships with doctors in Europe, revealing for the first time the names of doctors, how much individual pharma companies have paid them, and for what. From 30 June 2016, all pharmaceutical companies will be required to publish payments made in the previous year to doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals (HCPs), and identify them by name wherever possible. The new rules will also include payments to hospitals and other healthcare organisations (HCOs) across 33 European countries. Not surprisingly, there are some worries about what will happen in June: will …

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